DREAM act defeat: what next



(Continued from last week) I believe the DREAM Act — defeated in the Senate last week — is the most important legislation in our generation.

The DREAM Act is not progressive or radical – quite the contrary in fact.  It’s a modest piece of legislation that provides in-state tuition and avenues for military service for for some children who don’t have immigration documents. Some of these children and young people would be eligible for citizenship if they service in the US military or go to college.

However modest this legislation, the implications its defeat are enormous.  A million American children and young people will be living a life without papers.  That means they can’t go to college, they can’t get regular jobs, they are always at risk of being fired, they can’t call law enforcement, and they are unlikely to have access to quality medical care. A Million.  What will happen to those kids?  And what will happen to the rest of us?

Good coverage at Democracy Now featuring an interview with Roberto Lovato:

“So, the movement needs to be very clear that the commander-in-chief of the war on immigrants is not Joe Arpaio or Janice Brewer in Arizona, it’s Barack Obama in Washington, D.C. And so, the degree to which the movement starts seeing itself as separate from and pressuring the Obama administration on enforcement, because, you know, people are being terrorized, is the degree to which that movement will start changing, rather than be subsumed and subjected to the manipulations of groups in Washington, D.C. that basically will refuse to criticize Obama and actually applaud him for his support of the DREAM Act while being silent about that record deportation and terror that he’s foisting.”

https://i1.wp.com/globalvoicesonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/3669906851_0d3c9b9554.jpg

(Please make a note the following Democratic Senators who voted against education for kids: Max Baucus and Jon Tester of Montana, Ben Nelson of Nebraska, Kay Hagan of North Carolina, and Mark Pryor of Arkansas.)

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This entry was posted in Children, Education, human rights, Labor (Labour), Movement, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

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